Just the other day I came across this great article written by Jerry Cao and Kamil Zieba and Matt Ellis on Fast Company about website design. As arts organizations, we sometimes feel that we need to put a lot of information on every page of our website so that people can see everything we offer.

However, we must resist that temptation and learn to love white space in order for our websites to be as effective as possible.

All good visual artists understand the importance of negative space, the empty area that draws attention to, and accentuates, the actual subject. Negative space (the artistic equivalent of a designer’s white space) is like the supporting cast whose duty is to make the star of the show stand out more by not standing out so much themselves. If you don’t think any part of your design should be intentionally blank, take a look at the World’s Worst Website Ever for an extreme example of the damage caused by too many objects competing for attention. In interaction design, white space isn’t just an aesthetic choice— it serves three essential functions.

Read the entire article

Why White Space Is Crucial To UX Design

About Ceci Dadisman

Ceci is an arts marketer with over 10 years of experience successfully working with arts organizations and nonprofits utilizing innovative and cutting-edge initiatives. She is nationally recognized as a leader in digital and social media marketing and specializes in the integration of digital marketing and technology into traditional marketing methods.

A frequent public speaker, Ceci’s recent and upcoming engagements feature national conference appearances at NTEN, National Arts Marketing Project, Arts Midwest, OPERA America, and Chorus America in addition to many other local and regional events.

Ceci was born and raised in Pittsburgh, PA and graduated from West Virginia University. She currently lives in Cleveland and makes digital marketing magic at FORM, an agency that works exclusively with arts + culture and nonprofit organizations.

Don't Stop Hacking The Arts Yet...

Leave a Comment

Send this to a friend