Why You Shouldn’t Rely On Words Like “Today” Or “Tomorrow” On Social Media

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Over the past couple of days, I’ve been reminded why we shouldn’t rely on relative time-based words and phrases like “today,” “tomorrow,” or “next week” when posting on social media.

Why, you ask? Because I’m just now seeing #GivingTuesday posts from a variety of organizations — some of which I support and actively engage with on social platforms. Here are just a couple of examples:

We can clearly see that they were posted five days ago, yet they appeared in my feed today.

As arts organizations, much of our social media content is time-sensitive — especially when we’re promoting a show or exhibition, or other program. When posting, remember these things:

  • Be sure to include the date(s) of the event in every post.
  • Don’t expect that people will see your content the day you post it.
  • Remember that even those who like/follow your page won’t necessarily see your content at all.
  • Keep in mind that most people won’t see every post in your campaign.
  • Include a link to the event landing page on your website in every post.

About Ceci Dadisman

AvatarCeci Dadisman is a marketing professional with more than 15 years of experience creating effective communications campaigns utilizing innovative, forward thinking methods. She is nationally recognized as a leader in digital marketing and specializes in multichannel communications campaigns.

A frequent public speaker, Ceci’s recent and upcoming engagements feature national conference appearances at NTEN, Museums and the Web, National Arts Marketing Project, Arts Midwest, American Alliance of Museums, OPERA America, Midwest Museums Association, and Chorus America in addition to many other local and regional events. Known for her easy-going and vernacular style, she creates open learning environments with an emphasis on information sharing and useful takeaways.

She is a member of the National Arts Marketing Project Advisory Committee and the West Virginia University College of Creative Arts Visiting Committee, and is a mentor in West Virginia University’s Creative Consultant program. She also teaches the arts marketing course at West Virginia University’s College of Creative Arts and is on the faculty of Chorus America’s Chorus Management Institute.

Ceci was born and raised in Pittsburgh, PA and graduated from West Virginia University’s College of Creative Arts. She currently lives in Cleveland, Ohio.

2 thoughts on “Why You Shouldn’t Rely On Words Like “Today” Or “Tomorrow” On Social Media”

  1. Related to this issue of relative dates is the matter of location.

    All too often I see social media posts where the location of the event, or whatever’s being promoted/reported on, is not easily discerned from the post and there are times when it’s been nearly impossible to find out. There’s an assumption on the part of the post creator that everyone who will see the post knows them and where they are. This becomes important with livestreams once time zones are involved.

    Reply
    • Thank you. So true! I was just about to write about this same issue. Especially on Facebook there is often no information displayed about venues/cities.

      Reply

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